Go Ahead and Break It

Patterns denote a certain regularity – repeating designs or behaviors.

photo credit: @1ofmykind

photo credit: @1ofmykind

I have noticed l have a tendency to fall into a photographic pattern. It hit me while going through my photos one day. Whether shooting portraits, landscapes or even editorial I become comfortable with what has worked in the past and tend to repeat it- same poses, settings, subjects.

grass pattern

It can be difficult but fun to try and break out of patterns, try a different angle, a new lens, different settings, new pose, etc.

IMG_1376I am naturally drawn to certain subjects, and I find making a conscious effort to look at them from a different angle or focusing on a smaller part of the whole, keeps me from falling into a familiar pattern.

IMG_9737Not that we have to do something different every time, simply making an effort to create new takes on old scenes can spark a freshness in our perspective and get the “creative juices” flowing.

IMG_4608Also, choosing subjects that you may not usually photograph will have the same result and often this is right in front of our eyes! We just have to remember to raise the camera, focus and click.

To a week of breaking patterns.

~ Susan

A Patterned Place, or Two

the rookery chicago

The patterns are out there, both natural and man-made. When looking for patterns to photograph, buildings are where I find my lens gravitating often. This week, I explore some man-made patterns and ways to look at things in your everyday life for their pattern potential. Seems to me, many architects have an affinity for repeating geometric patterns and I have discovered I too have a fondness for these patterns. Architects Daniel Burnham and John Root designed a patterned masterpiece in the Rookery building in Chicago. The light court, above, is loaded with patterns; from the intricate iron work to the painted walls, it’s an awe-inspiring space. Staircases are often an architecturally interesting and pattern producing feature.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

CaixaForum, Madrid

CaixaForum, Madrid

This skyscraper is outside the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles.

Century City skyscrapers I am drawn to the two towers reflected in the mirrored building but I like the cut out space breaking up the pattern especially.

Sometimes, patterns can be found in unexpected places.

IMG_9366

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Pico House, Los Angeles

Let’s not overlook the amusement park for patterns.

Ferris Wheel

_MG_8237Incorporating patterns into your photos adds interest and impact.

This coming week, I will be looking for natural patterns.

On a patterned path,

~ Susan

Patterns are Powerful

Happy April! Here at Backyard Sisters a new month means a new photographic topic to explore and this month it’s patterns. Patterns are everywhere. Once you start taking note and incorporating them in your photos you may become a pattern fiend. Using patterns in a photo can draw in the viewer and keep them there as they are examining, following and maybe getting lost in your pattern. One place that immediately came to my mind to begin the pattern practice, The Getty Center in Los Angeles, is crawling with patterns;  in the architecture,

getty center patterns

Getty center patternsand in the gardens.

Getty garden patternsPatterns made by man,

Getty garden patternsgeometric patterns

Getty garden patternsand patterns found in nature.

pattern plantThis month, we turn our eyes and lenses to the patterns around us. See what patterns you can find as you go about your everyday life. The patterns are there, simply look around and see what designs captivate your imagination and will invite your viewers to get lost in your photos.

Looking forward to sharing a patterned month with you.

~ Susan